AAA: Teen-Driver Involved Crashes Kill 10 People a Day During 100 Deadliest Days

Deadly Teen Crashes Jump 14 Percent; Speed and Nighttime Driving are Major Factors 

05/30/18
Traffic Safety

MINNEAPOLIS (May 30, 2018) –More than 1,050 people were killed in crashes involving a teen driver in 2016 during the 100 Deadliest Days, the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day. That is an average of 10 people per day – a 14 percent increase compared to the rest of the year, according to data analyzed by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. As school lets out for summer, AAA stresses the importance of preparing and educating inexperienced teen drivers for some of the most dangerous driving days of the year.

 

“Research shows that young drivers are at greater risk and have higher crash rates compared to older and more experienced drivers,” said Matt Moseley, Certified Driving Instructor for AAA Minneapolis. “Through education, proper training, and involvement of parents, we can help our young drivers to become better and safer drivers, which in turn keeps the roads safer for everyone.”

 

Additional statistics based on 2016 NHTSA FARS data as analyzed by the AAA Foundation:

  • During 100 Deadliest Days, there was a 22 percent increase in the average number of nighttime crashes
  • 36 percent of all motor vehicle fatalities involving teen drivers occurred between 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • 29 percent of all motor vehicle deaths involving a teen driver were speed-related

 

“Not only are risks, like nighttime driving, a particular danger to young drivers, nearly every state also has a law restricting how late teens may be out on the roads,” said Moseley. “This is a timely reminder for parents to be actively involved in their teen’s learning-to-drive process, understanding the risks and to be educated on their state’s teen driving law.”

In Minnesota, teens with a provisional license, may not drive between the hours of midnight and 5a.m.

 

In preparation for the dangerous summer driving period, AAA encourages parents to educate their teens and themselves about risky driving behavior.  Parents should:

  • Discuss with teens early and often the dangers of risky driving situations, such as speeding and nighttime driving.
  • Teach by example and minimize your own risky behavior when behind the wheel.
  • Make a parent-teen driving agreement that sets family rules for teen drivers. Consider setting driving limits that are stronger than a state’s law, and enforce those limits.

 

About AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety: Established in 1947 by AAA, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety is a not-for-profit, publicly funded, 501(c)(3) charitable research and educational organization. The AAA Foundation’s mission is to prevent traffic deaths and injuries by conducting research into their causes and by educating the public about strategies to prevent crashes and reduce injuries when they do occur. This research is used to develop educational materials for drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists and other road users. Visit www.AAAFoundation.org.

 

About AAA: As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 58 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. Motorists can map a route, identify gas prices, find discounts, book a hotel and access AAA roadside assistance with the AAA Mobile app for iPhone, iPad and Android. Learn more at AAA.com/mobile. Find more information on AAA clubs at AAA.com.

 

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